Herbs are natural treatments, but not necessarily no side effects

herb

I mentioned before that taking herbs (TCM) has none to little side-effect. I apologize for saying that because actually although herbs are natural, it doesn’t mean that herbs do not have any side-effects.

If you happen to visit GNC store, you will notice that there is a section just for herbs. Take a piece of flyer and read the description of each herb, it will show you the reaction/side-effect of the herbs, if any.

Ginseng

Uses: Ginseng has been used to stimulate the adrenal gland, and thereby increase energy. It also may have some beneficial effect on reducing blood sugar in patients with diabetes mellitus. (Dr. Miller emphasized that there is substantial variation in the chemical components of substances branded as “Ginseng.”)

Reactions: Ginseng can cause elevation in blood pressure, headache, vomiting, insomnia, and nose bleeding. Ginseng can also cause falsely abnormal blood tests for digoxin (Lanoxin) levels in persons taking the drug for heart disease. It is unclear whether ginseng may affect female hormones. Its use in pregnancy is not recommended. Ginseng may affect the action of the normal blood clotting element (platelets). It should be avoided in patients taking aspirin, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as ibuprofen (Advil), naproxen (Aleve) or Motrin, or medications to prevent blood clotting (anticoagulants) such as warfarin (Coumadin). Ginseng may also cause headaches, tremors, nervousness, and sleeplessness. It should be avoided in persons with manic disorder and psychosis.

Ginkgo Biloba

Uses: This herb is very popular as a treatment for dementia (a progressive brain dysfunction) and to improve thinking.

Reactions: Mild stomach upset and headache have been reported. Ginkgo seems to have blood thinning properties. Therefore, it is not recommended to be taken with aspirin, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as ibuprofen (Advil), naproxen (Aleve) or Motrin, or medications to prevent blood clotting (anticoagulants) such as warfarin (Coumadin). Ginkgo should be avoided in patients with epilepsy taking seizure medicines, such as phenytoin (Dilantin), carbamazepine (Tegretol), and phenobarbital.

Garlic

Uses: Garlic has been used to lower blood pressure and cholesterol (Dr. Lucinda Miller notes that there is “…still insufficient evidence to recommend its routine use in clinical practice.”)

Reactions: Allergic reactions, skin inflammation, and stomach upset have been reported. Bad breath is a notorious accompaniment. Studies in rats have shown decreases in male rats’ ability to make sperm cells. Garlic may decrease normal blood clotting and should be used with caution in patients taking medications to prevent blood clotting (anticoagulants) such as warfarin (Coumadin).

But for lingzhi, it has been clinically tested and proven that there is NO side effect at all 🙂 You may read – How to take Lingzhi (Ganoderma) – Any side-effect if consume too much? 

Source – http://www.medicinenet.com/herbs__toxicities_and_drug_interactions/views.htm